Reply To: Assessment of progress of SEND

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#24318
Allysonallyson
Participant

    Hi Tamsin
    I’m responding as an EP who has been working to address precisely this issue through an App. We have a reading one ready to go.
    Measuring progress is different to measuring attainment. To measure progress, it’s helpful to have evidence of the relationship between the number of skill practices required in order to see measurable progress.
    The key is to decide small, precise measures of progress e.g. how many words in this book can this child read correctly, how many words in this sentence can they write correctly, how many examples of a maths skill can they complete in 5 minutes?
    Then if you deliver the target skill practices (keeping the actual tasks the same and making sure they practice correct skills) over a set period (3-5 days) you can see what a child can do on Friday with a particular skill, worksheet or reading book, compared to Monday. We have had some amazing examples of progress using this sort of approach because it just focuses on progress, and the learning process rather than the child and whether they have or haven’t achieved a skill – that gets assessed differently. So, for example, one Year 6 boy could spell 2/20 words correctly on Monday, but by Friday was spelling 13/20 correct, and another Year 6 boy, progressed from writing one correct sentence per week to writing 10 correct sentences a week after 6 weeks- each week he could see that could write more words correctly and we knew his bank of correct words so we could pitch the expected progress to a sensible rate for him . Children found it highly motivating e.g. being able to say, I read 130 words today and I can read 20 more than yesterday. Good stuff.
    It’s a really useful way of providing children with clear evidence that they can learn, useful to provide TA’s with exact expectations for the number of skill practices to be completed each day and it’s robust evidence to indicate the sort of support that a child needs in order to make progress e.g. in order for this child to be able to write three sentences independently, they need to practice writing at least 30 words a day or ten words three times a day. It’s great evidence for EHCP applications if you can provide 3-4 weeks of evidence of the sort of progress that can be made IF you have resources to deliver it.
    Hope this is useful.
    Allyson